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Welcome back guys to Technology Reviews, and today I will be reviewing the Xbox Elite Controller Series 2! This is the latest update of xbox controllers in Xbox’s Elite range, working on Xbox One and other consoles, including the upcoming Series X, and which was voted the best of E3 2019 by Hardware/Peripheral when it was released late last year! Although I needed help getting it set up to work with co-pilot which took a few months because as always I can’t be bothered using my brain (I’m being sarcastic guys _ disabled people do have a sense of humour) I got it set up a few months ago, and have had an easy enough time with it since. I won’t be talking about the set up in this review though, but if you want, I could do a separate blog on it in the future.

But before I start this review here’s a reminder of where you can follow me on social media. You can follow me on Twitter at @Phoebslyle and you can follow this blog on Twitter at @TechReviewsUK_. You can also follow me on Instagram at: therealphoebslyle, where if you also want to follow Technology Reviews it is: technologyreviewsuk, and you can also follow me on Soundcloud at: Phoebs Lyle, where I’m trying to set up a podcast.

But now let’s get in to my review of the Xbox Elite Controller Series 2.

The first thing you see when you get the Xbox Elite Wireless Controller Series 2 is the picture of the controller itself on the front, as well as the black handle on top of the box for opening it. As we head round the back, you see a couple more details, and at the back there’s two diagrams _ one for the limitless customisation you have on the front of the controller, and another diagram showing the durable components, along with more information, including some about the rechargeable long life battery that extends your gameplay. All this information is available on the xbox website, and in many different languages at the back.

When you open the box, the first thing you’ll see is the case _ which in itself is important because you can charge your controller in it _ then when you open that, you get your controller. (We’ll have a closer look at the controller later). Under the controller, you’ll see all the different thumbstick and d-pad options you have, and this is something I find very helpful because when I discovered I couldn’t use the circular d-pad already on your controller when it arrives, we were able to change it to the included magnetic original d-pad which I can use fine.

Different from the original Xbox Elite Controller, this one has 3 profiles you can use to customise your gameplay whatever way you like _ first introduced with the Xbox Adaptive Controller which is a controller hub for people with disabilities. Some other features you have are the rubberised grips going round the back and front, whereas before it was only around the back, an included key, which let’s you adjust the stiffness of the sticks, and most of all it has an internal battery and a long battery life. On the back, you still have your triggers and bumpers, and these triggers can be customised whether you want to be able to hold them down completely, hold them down half way, or just tap them. But as I game only using the front of the controller in co-pilot with the adaptive controller because I use my head and a chopstick in my mouth, I can’t really talk about the back controls in detail. Saying this, depending on if you can still use your hands and fingers and how much control you have, there is a chance you could still use this controller.

Also in the case _ as already hinted to _ is a charger brick… or clamp. If you set the charger clamp the right way and plug a usb into it before putting your controller on it, it charges like that, but you could also put the controller directly on the clamp, close the case and stretch a usb-c through the case to charge it. Alternatively if you want to still game while your controller is charging, you can plug it directly into your xbox console, or as I discovered a few weeks ago, if you’re sitting near a plug, still want to game and can’t move for any reason (say you’re a disabled gamer and it would be difficult to move), it still charges and works if you plug a USB into your controller and one into the nearest plug. Most days when I game at the minute I’m in one of the arm chairs at my house, so that’s easier for me.

Most of your customisations you do electronically in the Xbox Accessories app, e.g if you want to use the swap sticks function _ possible with the Elite Controller by swapping over your axis _ or if there’s any more button remapping you want to do. All your customisations will then show up in gameplay, which for me makes it easier because I play primarily using the right stick. The only bit of improvement I think Xbox could possibly add to their customisation options though is having an option for the stick clicks as that is something I find difficult.

So how accessible is the Xbox Elite Wireless Controller Series 2? For those with physical disabilities who are still able to press and hold, it might be accessible enough. Some of the buttons are slippery so they can be hard to hold on to, but like other accessories, it depends on what you can do. Although I can’t use the back buttons, I like how much you can edit them _ good for some people _ but my favourite features has to be how you can change your d-pad to whichever one’s easier, among others.

Selling for around £180, the Xbox Elite Wireless Controller Series 2 can be bought at any Microsoft store, Amazon store, game store, or at other shops.

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