Xbox Adaptive Controls: Which Switch is Best?

Gaming is one of the modern forms of entertainment, and can be enjoyed on many different devices. Following on from my reviews of the Xbox One S Minecraft Edition and Xbox Adaptive Controller last week, this week I will be rating the switches I use from 5-1, as we see which one of them is best!

(ALL THESE SWITCHES ARE DEVELOPED BY VARIOUS COMPANIES, BUT THIS BLOG IS NOT SPONSORED).

No 5: Spec’s Switch

The Specs Switch is smaller than other switches on this list, and is available in green, blue, yellow, red and black. Its box has a picture of the switch itself in whatever colour you ordered, with AbleNet’s logo and what the package includes on the back. When you bring it out you see the Specs Switch itself, a Flange, Flush and Strap Accessory Bases strap and a Quick Start Up guide. It includes a lead able to fit a 3.5mm jack which is needed to plug switches into the Adaptive Controller. So what else is there to say about it?

Although smaller than the Buddy Button, the Specs Switch requires much of the same pressure to activate. Like its counterparts, it can be plugged into any of the switch ports on the controller, but I feel like it is easier to press with a chopstick in my mouth, instead of behind my head. It is probably more suitable for people who have small movements.

No 4: Controller Switches

The switches on the Adaptive Controller come already attached and can be changed to whatever you want.

As explained in my last blog, the switches on the Adaptive Controller come automatically programmed to the A and B buttons, but can be changed to whatever you want. It’s easy to switch between them, and even the press is easy, but it does depend on what type of movements you have and how much pressure you have.

The Adaptive Controller can be bought for £74.99 on the Microsoft online store.

No 3: Buddy Buttons

The Buddy Button is available Blue, Red, Yellow Green or Black, and can be bought for $65 from AbleNet or £38 from Liberator. They are also sold through other Assistive Technology companies.

Buddy Buttons are medium size switches for the Adaptive Controller, which come in all the same colours as the Specs Switch. They are suitable for people with small movements and can be pressed with a light amount of pressure. These are switches I use for most of my gaming experience, and they can be put in whatever position you want. The only problem with them is that I feel like the red one is a bit too stiff, so if you want to hear them click I’d choose the other colours.

No 2: Ultra Light Switch

The Ultra Light Switch is available for £20 from Marblesoft, and is easily mountable.

The Ultra Light is a switch not even as big as your thumb and can be mounted easily to the actual Xbox Controller wherever you want. It’s easy to activate, needing only a very light amount of pressure, and can work as a walk forward button if you can only using one thumbstick at a time. To get this set up you just have to plug the lead into the X1 and X2 ports, and it can work with other switches.

No 1: Big Red Jelly Button Twist

The Big Red Jelly Bean Twist switch comes with different coloured switch caps, and costs £49.99 from the UK Microsoft Store.

The Big Red Jelly Bean Twist switch features a 2.5 inch activation surface and is recommended for users who are able to use a smaller target area. It comes with blue, green and yellow switch caps, allowing you to change to whichever colour you want. I bought this only because I needed more switches, but since it arrived it’s become one of my favourite switches. Being a bigger size, it allows me to keep my head on it while moving the joysticks, instead of having to lift my head when I try to move. The click is also very, very nice! The Big Red Jelly Bean twist can be bought from AbleNet and Liberator, but you can also get it for £49.99 from the Microsoft Store.

These are only a few of the switches that work with the Xbox Adaptive Controller, but any others that have a 3.5 mm jack will work.

Published by Phoebs Lyle (Breathe On UK)

23 year old HND Broadcast Journalism graduate and disability advocate from Northern Ireland, interested in politics, technology, and how it can become accessible to everyone, fantasy, and other stuff.

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